Dan Sampson

  • Entertainment
    Review: Magic and Mayhem: The Delusion of American Foreign Policy by Derek Leebaert

    “In war, truth is the first casualty.” The above quote is attributed to Aeschylus, a Greek writer and poet who lived in the 5th century BC. A variant of it, “The first casualty when war comes is the truth“, is reputed to have been uttered in 1917 by Hiram W. Johnson, a...

  • Entertainment
    Review: God, no! by Penn Jillette

    Penn Jillette goes on the offensive (in both senses of the word) in his new book God, no! (Simon & Schuster, $24.99). An avowed and vocal atheist, he attacks faith with a joyful fervor, highlighting the inconsistencies, contradictions, and hypocrisy of religious teachings. In this, his fourth book (or sixth if you...

  • Entertainment
    Review: The Oil Kings by Andrew Scott Cooper

    Energy costs are unsustainably high, relations between the United States and the oil producing nations of the world are tense at best and outright hostile at worst, and there are calls from all corners for America to find alternative energy sources and ween itself off its reliance on foreign oil. With the...

  • Community
    Review: The Astounding, The Amazing and The Unknown by Paul Malmont

    Paul Malmont’s The Astounding, The Amazing and The Unknown (Simon & Schuster, $26) merges science fiction with historical fact for a tremendously entertaining caper that sees the founding fathers of the emerging genre band together to save the world from the Nazi’s in World War II. This, the second book in a...

  • Entertainment
    David Ignatius at Politics & Prose – Friday, June 10th

    The Washington Post’s award-winning columnist David Ignatius will be speaking at Politics & Prose on Friday, 10th July about his new book, Bloodmoney. This, his eighth work of fiction, continues in the same vein as the hugely successful Body of Lies — a frenetically-paced espionage thriller with a complex, multi-layered plot involving...

  • Entertainment
    Review: Hitler’s Holy Relics by Sidney D. Kirkpatrick

    In the classic adventure flick Raiders of the Lost Ark, our indefatigable hero Indiana Jones pursues a group of Nazis who have located and stolen from its resting place the Ark of the Covenant, the golden chest said to contain the tablets on which the Ten Commandments were inscribed. The villains of...

  • Entertainment
    Review: To End All Wars by Adam Hochschild

    More than 16 million people died in World War I. 21 million more suffered injuries as a result of the conflict. In total, close to forty million casualties in a war that we now know did more to destabilize the world in the years that followed than secure any kind of lasting...

  • Entertainment
    Review: The Year We Left Home by Jean Thompson

    In the lives of the characters in Jean Thompson’s The Year We Left Home (Simon & Schuster, $25) everything is limited. Limited conversations, limited ambitions and, above all, limited expectations of life. A feeling of claustrophobia — suffocating for some, oddly comforting to others — drenches the story. The parochial concerns and...

  • Entertainment
    Review: Loyalty – The Vexing Virtue by Eric Felten

    Let’s imagine you and a sibling work for the same company, and the company is owned and run by a common friend. One day the friend is out of the office when a delivery is made. The delivery includes an extra box of supplies added to the order by mistake. Your sibling...